Oracle ACE program

What is the Oracle ACE program?

The Oracle ACE program is a community advocacy program for Oracle technology evangelists and enthusiasts, sponsored by and managed by Oracle Corporation.  As stated on the ACE overview page at “”, it is both a network as well as a resource for everyone in the Oracle community.  It is not a certification program, and there is no course to study and no test to pass.  Rather, the ACE program is a recognition program by one’s colleagues and peers, and joining is a process of nomination, review, and acceptance.

Who are Oracle ACEs?

They are your colleagues in the worldwide Oracle technology community, of which you and the RMOUG community here in Colorado are a significant part.  There are now more than 500 people in 55 countries around the world who have been recognized by their peers and by Oracle Corporation.  They are not employees of Oracle, but rather partners and customers of Oracle.

The ACE program is now 10 years old and comprises three levels…

ACE Associate logoACE Associate – this is the entry-point for the program and an ideal form of recognition for technology community advocates who are building their reputations

ACElogoACE– established advocates for Oracle technology who are well-known in their community

ACEDlogoACE Directors – top-tier members of the worldwide community who engage with many users groups and advocates and with Oracle Corporation

The ACE program is always growing, and the current members of the program are always happy to help you make the step up and jump to the next level in your career.  ACEs are expected to contribute to all or some of the following:

  • contribute actively to technical forums like OTN community forum or the ORACLE-L email list
  • publishing articles in newsletters, magazines, blogs
  • publishing books
  • tweet, post on social media
  • organize community activities such as Oracle users groups
  • present sessions at Oracle conferences and Oracle user group meetings

Few people do all these things, so don’t think that everyone does, but also please be aware that there are some who do, driving their careers above and beyond.

Joining the ACE program is not a one-time task, but an on-going commitment to contribution and sharing to build your community, whether that community is local to where you live, national, or world-wide.

To find out more about the program, go to the web page at “” or just contact one of the Oracle ACEs near you and ask questions.

That’s why we’re here.

If you want something done, ask a busy person…

This is a re-post I originally made on the ODTUG website on 17-Jan 2013 at the beginning of my two-year term on the board of directors...

This past weekend, I attended my first face-to-face Board of Directors meeting with ODTUG. Monty Latiolais, current president of ODTUG, asked me to let him know if there was anything “less than stellar” about my experience, and I have say the answer is “no”.  It was a stellar experience, all weekend.  Here’s why…

For 20 years, I’ve been a member of the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group.  My boss at Oracle at the time, Valerie Borthwick, told everyone in our team that the best thing we could do for our career and for our business practice was to “become famous”.  Not famous (or infamous) as in “celebrity” or “rock star”, but famous as in “known within our industry”.  Today, she would be telling us to blog and tweet, but back then, she was telling us to write and post white papers and to do presentations.  Put our ideas out there.  Discuss what we knew.  Submit to peer reviews.

The biggest thing I learned then is that you cannot claim to know something until you’ve tried to explain it to others.  Lots of people know something well.  But unless they’ve tried to explain it to others, there will be gaps in knowledge, fuzzy areas in understanding, and lack of depth.  Explaining to others fills gaps, clarifies fuzzy areas, and deepens the superficial.  Weak points are rapidly exposed while presenting information in public.  So, as I found ways to explain what I thought I already knew, I had to fix these problems, and my career flourished.

So in 1995, I joined the board of directors at RMOUG, because I wanted to spend more time around smart people, and see how they make things happen. That’s where I learned my next big lesson, which is when you have an important task, give it to a busy person, because they get it done.

It seems a bit counter-intuitive, but as you stop and observe those around you, it becomes obvious…

  • Some people like to think about doing things, but never do it
  • Others plan to do things, but never do it
  • Others talk themselves out of doing things before they ever get started, so they never do it
  • And others simply refuse to do anything

The people who are always busy are always getting things done.

That is what I found with the board of ODTUG, busy people who have plenty to do already, doing one more thing.

My favorite kind of people.

One year at Delphix

It’s been over a year since I leapt into the void.

OK, more than a little melodramatic.  In many respects, I was leaping from the void by joining a promising and exciting startup company like Delphix.

Business was still brisk as an independent consultant at EvDBT, but for the past several years, I was experiencing what I called “just-in-time engagements”.  That is, new consulting engagements were just mysteriously showing up at the right time just before the current one was ending.  Frankly, it was getting a bit spooky, and I had been on pins and needles for a couple years watching it happen, wondering like a farmer if the day would come when the rain did not appear on time.  That day had shown up previously, during the recession of 2001 – 2002, when I experienced about 2-3 weeks of no work early in 2002, but that was the only dry spell I encountered in almost 16 years at EvDBT.  However, I wasn’t eager to see another one…

So a little over twelve months ago, on 01-May 2014, I left the world of Oracle technology consulting that I had first entered on January 15, 1990.  Well, I haven’t really left Oracle technology, but I’m no longer making a living at it.  Oracle is a big part of Delphix, but only a part.

What have been the highlights during my first year at Delphix?

  • learning data virtualization
  • learning how to tune virtual databases for Oracle and SQL Server
  • learning VMware and earning my VCA certification
  • carving a personal niche within a small company
  • became proficient at Windows Powershell    <- no kidding!  true!
  • continuing to present at Oracle conferences, often traveling and presenting with my brilliant wife, Kellyn Gorman

Yes, Kellyn and I got married during the past year!  It took us each a few tries at marriage, but we each hung in there, and got it right this time.  They say that remarriage is the triumph of optimism over experience, and I’m delighted to say that optimism trumps experience.  We did the deed in grand style, spending the week at Oracle Open World in San Francisco, coming home on Friday and getting married that Sunday in a tiny ceremony with immediate family only.  We finished up the RMOUG TD2015 call-for-papers on Wednesday and Kellyn publshed the agenda on Thursday, and then on Saturday we flew to Europe to do a joint-keynote and present at the Slovenian Oracle Users Group in Ljubljana and the Croatian Oracle Users Group in Rovinj.  After spending time with Joze and his lovely wife Lili, we blasted out of Croatia and scooted over to beautiful Venice for a quiet, blissful week-long honeymoon, meeting with Lothar and his lovely wife Birgit during the week as well.

Then, it was back to reality through the end of the year, getting swept up in the preparations for the RMOUG conference.

Delphix had a spectacular Q4 ending on 31-January 2015, where that financial quarter alone equaled the earnings from the entire previous fiscal year.  Lots of celebrations, victory laps, and high fives at the company all-hands meeting in early February, but what none of us in the Professional Services division saw was the looming tsunami of freshly-sold new deployments cresting just over our heads.  That wave crested and crashed down on us, and I found myself buried in work.  Just now, four months later in the new fiscal year, I’m finally able to look up and look around to find that winter and spring have passed and summer has arrived.My second year at Delphix has begun, and I’m curious as to what it will bring.

I’m continuing to heed the advice of Tim Minchin, who counsels against pursuing one’s Big Dream and instead suggests passionate dedication to short-term goals, in short that one be “micro-ambitious”.  That is say, that thing that is right in front of you right now?  Do it the very best you can, and put your back into it.  Whether it is a blog post, cutting the lawn, an email, or a new wax ring for the toilet in the basement.  Especially the new wax ring – don’t bugger that up!  And then do the next thing the same way.  And the next.  And the next.  Before you know it, you’ve climbed a mountain and have made a pretty good career besides.

Not unexpectedly at a small fast-growing company, hints have been made of a transition from the technical track to the managerial track.  This would finally reverse the track switch I made over 20 years ago while at Oracle, when I stepped off the managerial track in favor of the technical track.  I’ve never looked back on that decision, but should I be “micro-ambitious” here as well, take the new task right in front of me, and work to excel?  Or stick to my guns, stay with the technical track?

I’ve learned that it is a mistake to just “go with the flow” and bob along with the prevailing current.  If one is to succeed at something new, it must be a whole-hearted plunge accompanied by a full-throated war cry.

So, if you hear a strange noise rather like a cross between a “Tarzan yell” and someone choking on an avocado pit, don’t be alarmed.  Just listen a little longer to find whether you hear the “splat” of my corpse hitting pavement, or the “whoosh” as I learn to fly again.

And rest assured, that wax ring in the downstairs toilet?  Nailed it.

Will the real data virtualization please stand up?

There is a post from a good friend at Oracle entitled “Will the REAL SnapClone functionality please stand up?” and, as well-written and technically rich as the post is, I am particularly moved to comment on the very last and conclusive sentence in the post…

So with all of that, why would you look at a point solution that only covers one part of managing your Oracle infrastructure?

The post does not refer to Delphix by name, and it could in fact be referring to any number of companies, but Delphix is the market leader in this space, so it is reasonable to assume that the “Product X” mentioned throughout the post is Delphix.  The same holds true for any post commenting on relational database technology, which can reasonably be assumed to refer to Oracle.  Regardless, I was struck by the use of the phrase point solution in that final sentence of the post, and how it really is a matter of perspective, and how interesting is that perspective.

First of all, before we go any further, please let me say that, as an Oracle DBA for the past 20 years, I think that the current release of Oracle’s Enterprise Manager, EM12c, is the finest and most complete release of the product since I tested early versions of Oracle EM alongside the Oracle8i database in the late 1990s.  At that time, the product was full of promise, but it wasn’t something upon which an enterprise could truly rely.  That has certainly changed, and it has been a long time coming, starting with the advent of utilities like AWR, ASH, and Active Session History.  If you have extensive Oracle technology in your organization, you should be using EM12c to manage it.  Not EM11g, or EM10g, but EM12c.  It really is that good, and it is getting better, and there are talented people behind it, and you simply need it if you want to maximize your investment in Oracle technology.

But just because EM12c is the center of the universe of Oracle technology, what about organizations for whom Oracle technology is merely a component?  Many organizations have diverse IT infrastructures comprising Microsoft, IBM, SAP, and open-source technologies, and all of those technology components share the need for the basic use-cases of quickly and economically cloning production to create non-production environments to support development, testing, reporting, archival, and training activities.

Should those diverse IT organizations employ a silo tool like EM12c just for cloning Oracle databases, and then find the same functionality separately for each of those other separate technologies?  Would doing so be a tactical or a strategic decision?

So in response to the final question in the SnapClone post, I ask another question in turn…

Why would one look at a point solution that covers only Oracle database?

Access to data for development and testing is the biggest constraint limiting development and testing, so it doesn’t make sense to not enable data virtualization for all applications, regardless of whether they are comprised of Oracle technology or not.  IT agility is a strategic capability important to the entire business, not a technical challenge for a component silo.

But perhaps, in the interest of continuing the Oracle-only focus of the SnapClone post, we could stay inside the bounds of Oracle.  Fair enough, as a theoretical exercise…

So, even if we limit the discussion only to Oracle technology, it quickly becomes obvious that another important question looms…

Why would one look at a point solution that covers only the Oracle database, leaving the application software, database software, configuration files, and all the other necessary parts of an application as a further problem to be solved?

Anybody who has managed IT environments knows that the database is just one part of a complete application stack.  This is true for applications by Oracle (i.e. E-Business Suites, PeopleSoft, JDEdwards, Demantra, Retek, etc), as well as prominent applications like SAP, and every other application vendor on the planet, and beyond.

To do this, one needs a solution that virtualizes file-system directories with software, files, and everything that comprises the application, not just an Oracle database.

To provision those complete environments for developers and testers quickly and inexpensively, one needs both server virtualization and data virtualization.

Unless one has spent the past 10 years in deep space chasing a comet, you’ve already got server virtualization on board.  Check.

Now, for data virtualization, you need to virtualize Oracle databases, check.  And you also need to virtualize SQL Server databases, check.  And PostgreSQL and Sybase databases, check and check.  In the near future, Delphix will likely be virtualizing IBM DB2 and MySQL databases, not to mention MongoDB and Hadoop, ‘cuz that’s what we do.  Check, check, … check-a-mundo dudes and dudettes.

Despite this, even if you’re a single-vendor organization, you need to virtualize files directories and files, on UNIX/Linux platforms as well as Windows servers.

Delphix does all of the above, which is one reason why it is the market leader in this space.

And it has been in general use for years, and so a substantial portion of the Fortune 500 already relies on data virtualization from Delphix today, across their entire technology portfolio, as the partial list online here shows.

Perhaps it is only a point solution from one perspective, but be sure that your perspective is aligned with that of your whole IT organization, and that you’re not just thinking of a strategic business capability as merely “functionality” within a silo.

Data Virtualization and Greener Data Centers

On the Saturday before the Oracle OpenWorld 2014 conference started, I had the added bonus of finding out that the Data Center Journal had published my article on how data virtualization leads to greener data centers.

So, rather than reprise the article here (which I’m tempted to do), please instead click here and give it a read!

Lovin’ la vida Oracle

As we prepare for the week of Oracle OpenWorld 2014, I look back on the 25 years I have spent within the orbit of Oracle Corporation.

I joined Oracle Consulting Services (OCS) as an employee on 15-January 1990 and worked my way to Technical Manager when I resigned to start my own consultancy on 31-July 1998.  I worked as an independent Oracle consultant from then (with a side trip into company-building with friends) until 30-April this year.  On 01-May 2014, I joined startup Delphix.

Throughout this quarter-century of La Vida Oracle, I’ve made a great living, but it has also been a great way of life.  I started presenting at the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group in 1993, and joined the board of directors in 1995.  I’ve since worked with many other Oracle users groups as a volunteer and I’ve found the experiences to be incredibly educational, in so many ways.  I’ve also met a lot of amazing people through volunteering at Oracle users groups.  I met the junta of the Oak Table Network, and joined that group in 2002.  I was elected as an Oracle ACE in 2007, before I even knew the program existed, then I was made an ACE Director in 2012, which is an elevation I appreciate but still never sought.

But over it all, all throughout, is Oracle.  The Big Red O.  Some people have had bad experiences at Oracle Corporation, some have had REALLY bad experiences, just as people have good and bad experiences at any huge corporation.  In the spirit of a comment made famous by Winston Churchill, “Democracy is the absolute worst form of government.  Except for all the others.”  Oracle is populated by, and led by, some very human … beings.  I love them all, some more than others.

So for 25 years now, out of the 37 years Oracle has been in existence, I have had a really great life.  La vida Oracle.  I am so GLAD I met ya!  And I love this life!

And so it continues today.  For the first time in a quarter century, I’m out of the direct orbit of Oracle, now that I’m working at Delphix.  I’m still heavily involved with Oracle as an Oracle ACE Director and adviser to the boards of three local Oracle users groups (RMOUG, NoCOUG, and NEOOUG) and a board member at ODTUG.

Delphix builds data virtualization software for Oracle, PostgreSQL, SQL Server, and Sybase ASE, as well as file-system directories on Unix/Linux and Windows.  Virtualizing Oracle databases is a big part of Delphix’s business, but it is not the only part, and the non-Oracle parts are growing rapidly.  It’s refreshing to work with other database technologies.  But I still love working with Oracle Database, and I’m continually impressed by Oracle’s technology prowess, with the In-Memory option of Database12c a brilliant example.

Some say that Delphix competes with Oracle.  Be serious – please name a technology company that doesn’t compete with Oracle in one way or another, as the breadth of Oracle products and services is so expansive.

As an independent contractor at EvDBT for 16 years, I myself competed with Oracle Consulting in my own very small way.  But, at the same time I cooperated with Oracle by optimizing the implementation of Oracle technology.  I sure as heck understand who hold the tent up.

The same is true with Delphix.  As a company, Delphix products can be said to compete with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control, in the niche area known as Database-As-A-Service (DBaaS) in the specific SnapClone functionality.  The Delphix software appliance is very similar to this SnapClone piece, but this part of the Oracle product is just a small part of the scope the vast EM12c Cloud Control product suite.

In the same way, I as an independent consultant could have been said to have competed with the EM12c diagnostics pack and performance tuning pack, because the techniques I used and taught tended to make people independent of those tools.

That’s not to say I steered people away from EM12c; it’s just that I myself didn’t use it for performance tuning, though gradually I learned to appreciate many of its features, not least through paying attention to my wife Kellyn Pot’vin.

In fact, the Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control, using the Cloud API, can fully administer virtual databases created by Delphix.  After all, Delphix is just an alternate mechanism to implement data virtualization.  Instead of using the mechanism of Oracle DBaaS SnapClone, customers can also use Delphix.  So Delphix can become a part of EM12c.

So there is no competition between Delphix and Oracle.  Delphix is an alternative to the SnapClone mechanism underlying DBaaS, but Delphix virtual databases can still be orchestrated through the EM12c console.  It need not be an either-or choice.

Of course, I still have to write that extension through the EM12c cloud API, and I’m getting right on that.  Unless someone else gets to it first.

Keep your eye on the Oracle EM12c Extension Exchange webpage for more progress on integrating Delphix within EM12c…

#OakTable World at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

WhereChildren’s Creativity Museum, 221 4th St, San Francisco

When:  Mon-Tue, 29-30 September, 08:30 – 17:00 PDT

For the third year in a row at the same fantastic location right in the heart of the bustling Oracle OpenWorld 2014 extravaganza, OakTable World 2014 is bringing together the top geeks of the worldwide Oracle community to present on the topics not approved for the OpenWorld conference.  At the OpenWorld conference.  For free.

The beauty of this unconference is its ad-hoc nature.  In 2010, weary of flying from Europe to endure marketing-rich content, Mogens Norgaard conceived Oracle ClosedWorld as an informal venue for those who wanted to talk about cool deep-technical topics.  Oracle ClosedWorld was first held in the back dining room at Chevy’s Fresh Mex on 3rd and Howard, fueled by Mogens’ credit card holding an open tab.  The following year in 2011, ClosedWorld was moved a little ways down Howard Street to the upstairs room at the Thirsty Bear, once again fueled by Mogens’ (and other) credit cards keeping a tab open at the bar.

In 2012, Kyle Hailey took the lead, found a fantastic venue, herded all the cats to make a 2-day agenda, and arranged for corporate sponsorship from Delphix, Pythian, and Enkitec, who have continued to sponsor OakTable World each year since.

If you’re coming to Oracle OpenWorld 2014 and are hungry for good deep technical content, stop by at OakTable World 2014, located right between Moscone South and Moscone West, and get your mojo recharged.

If you’re local to the Bay Area but can’t afford Oracle OpenWorld, and you like deep technical stuff about Oracle database, stop by and enjoy the electricity of the largest Oracle conference in the world, and the best Oracle unconference right in the heart of it all.

OakTable World 2014 – driven by the OakTable Network, an informal society of drinkers with an Oracle problem.

#CloneAttack at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

Delphix and Dbvisit will be at the OTN Lounge in the lobby of Moscone South from 3:30 – 5:00pm on Monday 29-Sept.  Come join us to hear about #CloneAttack and #RepAttack, two great hands-on learning opportunities.


#CloneAttack is your chance to install a complete Delphix lab environment on your Windows or Mac laptop for you to play with and experiment at any time.  Experts Kyle Hailey, Steve Karam, Adam Bowen, Ben Prusinski, and I will be sharing USB “thumb” drives with the virtual machine OVA files for the lab environment, and we will be working one-on-one with you to help you get everything up and running, then to show you basic use-cases for cloning with Delphix.

Bring your laptop, bring your VMware, and get some data virtualization into your virtual life!

At the same time, #CloneAttack will be joined by #RepAttack by Dbvisit, where Arjen Visser, Jan Karremans, and the team will be helping you replicate Oracle to Oracle for zero downtime upgrades.

This just in!  #MonitorAttack from Confio SolarWinds will also be joining the party at the CCM on Tuesday to show you how to quickly and easily install Confio Ignite and enjoy the great features there.


Children’s Creativity Museum, 221 4th St, San Francisco


Tuesday, Sept 30 from 10am – 5pm PDT

Before you arrive:

Hardware requirements (either Mac or Windows):

  • at least 8 GB RAM
  • at least 50 GB free disk space, but preferably 100 GB free
  • at least 2 Ghz CPU, preferably dual-core or better

Hello Delphix!

After almost 16 years as an independent consultant, with a couple side-steps into the world of small consulting-services startups, I’ve accepted an offer from Delphix, a startup building the future of information technology, enabling agile data management and storage virtualization.

I’m closing EvDBT as a business, since the employee count will reduce from one to zero, and finishing up my consulting engagements, starting with my new employer on 01-May 2014.

Thank you, EvDBT.  You were my lifeboat and my vehicle to a better career and a better life!

The DBA is dead. Again.

Mark Twain never said, “Reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.”  Instead, his comment in 1897 was less tongue-in-cheek than matter-of-fact.  Confronted with news reports that he was gravely ill he responded, “James Ross Clemens, a cousin of mine, was seriously ill two or three weeks ago in London, but is well now.  The report of my illness grew out of his illness; the report of my death was an exaggeration.”  I can only hope that, while being equally matter of fact, in the retelling my comments will also grow wittier than they were written.  It is a lot for which to hope, as past experience is that my comments generally provoke unintended offense.

Every few years, when wondrous new automation appears imminent, reports surface about the long-anticipated death of the role of the database administrator.  Sometimes it seems these reports arise out of sheer frustration that DBAs and databases still exist, as seemed to have happened in 2008 during a conversation on the Oak Table email list, which closely followed a similar discussion on the ORACLE-L list.  To whit:  the war is over, and we lost.

Alex Gorbachev commented succinctly at the time:

We have already “lost” the war many times, haven’t we?  We lost it to object-oriented databases (8i?)  We lost to XML databases (9i?)  We lost to grid databases (10g?)  And we are losing to what now with 11g?  The “fusion” will save us all with or *without* databases in the first place?  Yeah right … the end is close.

The focus of discussion on both email lists was a thought-provoking blog post in March 2008 by Dom Brooks entitled “The dea(r)th of Oracle RDBMS and contracting?” He commented that the tide of history had finally turned against the Oracle database and the highly-visible role of database administrator.  Stiff competition from open-source competitors, emerging scalable technologies, absurd license fees, and belt-tightening by many IT shops were the overwhelming trend.  Poor database design exacerbated by immature implementation; if you’re going to produce a disaster, probably best that it not cost as much as Oracle.

My response on both email threads on ORACLE-L and the Oak Table was this…

Back in the 1980s, I worked for a company that had built some really cool applications in the area of travel reservations.  Eventually, the travel providers (i.e. airlines, hotels, car rental agencies, etc) caught on to what we were doing and did it themselves, effectively putting us out of business overnight.  So, it came time to sell the company off in pieces.  We tried to sell the applications, but nobody wanted them — they had their own, or could buy or build better.  We sold the hardware and facilities, but for pennies on the dollar.  Then, when we tried to sell the data, we hit the jackpot — everybody wanted the data, and we were able to sell it over and over again, to multiple buyers.

I never forgot that lesson, and several years later traded being a programmer for being a DBA because (as Michael just said, below) I like working with data.  Data, not programs, is the only thing that matters — applications are transient and have no value except to acquire, manipulate, and display data.  Data is the only thing with value.  The long-term value of data is the reason I’ve moved toward data warehousing and business intelligence, too.

Data is important.  Databases manage data.  DBAs architect, configure, and manage databases.  So, being a skilled database administrator will always be necessary as long as data exists.  If the state of the art ceases advancing, then automation will finally catch up to extinguish the DBA role/job.  But until then, being a DBA is a career.

That’s my story.  And I’m stickin’ to it.

Doug Burns was following both threads and was kind enough to lend his support in a post to his blog entitled “There’s Hope For Us All“, in which he stated “although it doesn’t reflect my personal experience in the slightest, there was something about what he had to say and the way he said it that rung very true to me.”  Kinder words are rarely spoken, and thank you, Doug.  And thank you too Dom, for your follow-up comment to Doug’s post, “Solidarity Brother!  I’m sure Tim’s right and will continue to be right.  I was having an emotional moment… the flat earth society are everywhere!

We all have those moments.

And here we are again, having another moment.

Once again, the topic of discussion on the Oak Table list was a blog post from Kenny Gorman (no relation) entitled “The Database Administrator Is Dead.”  My father, who was a police officer for 25 years, worked in a profession much more dangerous, and certainly several people had wished him harmed or dead over his career and even acted in that direction, but in a general way my chosen profession has received more death threats, it seems.

Now, the forces opposing the DBA are not necessarily cheaper, different, or disruptive technology, but better automation and provisioning.  The role of the DBA will literally be smothered out of existence, as highly-automated management consoles extend to the ultimate capability.  “Database As A Service” or “DBaaS“, cloud provisioning for databases, is the next development to obsolesce the database administrator.

The synchronicity of these discussions is spooky.  During the week previous to the discussion of Mr. [Kenny] Gorman’s blog post, I had related another particular story 4-5 separate times to 4-5 separate people, and now I found that I was relating it yet again, this time to the Oak Table email list.  It was something of a continuation from my earlier story…

In the 1990s, when I chose to move from being a developer to a DBA, the trend of out-sourcing was quite abundantly evident, not quite augmented by the trend of offshoring yet.  In 1999 I did my first ever keynote address at a conference in Portland, Maine to the Maine’S Oracle Users Group (MSOUG) on the topic of being a DBA in a world of out-sourcing.  I described a visualization of one of those water-holes in the Sahara.  A water-hole that is brimming and supporting a lush oasis during the rainy season, but that dries up and shrinks to a small muddy puddle during the dry season, surrounded by dead vegetation and dead animals that didn’t quite make it to the water-hole or another.

Repeating the comments in Doug’s blog, code comes and goes but data is the only thing with lasting value.  I visualized that the dead vegetation and dead animals surrounding the muddy remainders of the water-hole were developers and DBAs whose jobs were outsourced.  Right in the middle of the muddy water were two eyes above the surface, and this was the skilled DBA, guarding the remainder of the water-hole, containing only the most important stuff that couldn’t be outsourced or offshored.  I had long decided that I would be that DBA, and stay as close to the data as I could, and especially the most strategic data (i.e. data warehousing).

I figure y’all might have as much fun as the good folks at MSOUG did with that visualization, especially when subjected to Freudian and Jungian dream analysis.

Though it has nothing to do with why I’ve related this story 4-5 times previously this week, in this context, the author of the article (we’re not related) talks about having been an Oracle DBA 15 years ago, which is about the time I did my keynote for MSOUG.

Perhaps he left the field too early too early?  :-)

I completely agree with his “automate or die” comment, and I might add “keeping learning or die”, and of course the job’s roles are changing, but besides DBaaS being a long way from the pointy-and-clicky utopia that this post implies, the question remains: who sets up the DBaaS environments?  DBaaS isn’t the end of the DBA role, it is more automation.

Who will set up DBaaS environments, if not DBAs?  Don’t get me wrong:  I agree that DBaaS is here.  And I think DBAs will set it up, use it, and improve on it.

That’s my story.  And I’m stickin’ to it.

Evergreen Database Technologies, Inc.