All posts by Tim Gorman

Tim Gorman is a technical consultant for Delphix who enable data virtualization to increase the agility of IT development and testing. Mr Gorman is past president of the Rocky Mtn Oracle Users Group (RMOUG.org) where he has been a member since 1992 and a board member since 1995. He is also a former board member of the Oracle Developer Tools Users Group (ODTUG.com). He is an adviser to the boards of the Northern California Oracle Users Group (NoCOUG.org) and the Northeast Ohio Oracle Users Group (NEOOUG.org). He is also an adviser to the board of Project SafeGuard (PSGhelps.org) which provides legal advice to victims of domestic violence. Tim has co-authored six books, performed technical review on eight more books, has been an Oracle ACE since 2007 and an Oracle ACE Director since 2012, a member of the Oak Table Network since 2002, has an author's page on Amazon, and has presented at Oracle Open World, Collaborate, KScope, Hotsos, RMOUG, UKOUG, and Oracle users groups in lots of wonderful places around the world.

RMOUG calendar page

RMOUG calendar pageFor those who are always seeking FREE technical learning opportunities, the calendar webpage of the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group (RMOUG) is a great resource to bookmark and check back on weekly.

RMOUG volunteers compile notifications of webinars, meetings, and meetups from the internet and post them here for everyone to use.

The information technology (IT) industry is always evolving and therefore always changing.

Free webinars, even if they seem too commercial at times, always have at least one solid nugget of solid information that can make the difference in a professional’s life and career.

You never know when the need for new information that nobody else knows is going to come in handy.

Stay a step ahead…

Avoiding Regret

After working for a variety of companies in the 1980s, after working for Oracle in the 1990s, after trying (and failing) to build a company with friends at the turn of the century, and after more than a decade working as an independent consultant in this new century, I found myself in a professional dilemma last year.

I know I need to work at least another ten years, probably more like fifteen years, to be able to retire.  I had survived the nastiest economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Great Recession of 2008-2011, while self-employed, and felt ready to take on the economic upswing, so I was confident that I could work steadily as an independent Oracle performance tuning consultant for the next 15 years or more.

Problem was: I was getting bored.

I loved my work.  I enjoy the “sleuthiness” and the forensic challenge of finding performance problems, testing and recommending solutions, and finding a way to describe it clearly so that my customer can make the right decision.  I am confident that I can identify and address any database performance problem facing an application built on Oracle database, and I’ve dozens of successful consulting engagements to bear witness.  I have a legion of happy customers and a seemingly endless supply of referrals.

Being confident is a great feeling, and I had spent the past several years just enjoying that feeling of confidence on each engagement, relishing the challenge, the chase, and the conclusion.

But it was becoming routine.  The best explanation I have is that I felt like a hammer, and I addressed every problem as if it was some form of nail.  I could feel my mental acuity ossifying.

Then, opportunity knocked, in an unexpected form from an unexpected direction.

I have a friend and colleague whom I’ve known for almost 20 years, named Kyle Hailey.  Kyle is one of those notably brilliant people, the kind of person to whom you pay attention immediately, whether you meet online or in person.  We had both worked at Oracle in the 1990s, and I had stayed in touch with him over the years since.

About four years ago, I became aware that he was involved in a new venture, a startup company called Delphix.  I wasn’t sure what it was about, but I paid attention because Kyle was involved.  Then, about 3 years ago, I was working as a DBA for a Colorado-based company who had decided to evaluate Delphix’s product.

Representing my customer, my job was to prevent a disaster from taking place.  I was to determine if the product had any merit, if the problems being experienced were insurmountable, and if so let my customer know so they could kill the project.

Actually, what my boss said was, “Get rid of them.  They’re a pain in my ass“.  I was just trying to be nice in the previous paragraph.

So OK.  I was supposed to give Delphix the bum’s rush, in a valid techie sort of way.  So I called the Delphix person handling the problem, and on the other end of the phone was Kyle.  Hmmm, I can give a stranger the bum’s rush, but not a friend.  Particularly, not someone whom I respect like a god.  So, instead I started working with him to resolve the issue.  And resolve it we did.  As a result, the company bought Delphix, and the rest is history.

Here’s how we did it…

But first, what does Delphix do?  The product itself is a storage appliance on a virtual machine in the data center.  It’s all software.  It uses sophisticated compression, deduplication, and copy-on-write technical to clone production databases for non-production usage such as development and testing.  It does this by importing a copy of the production database into the application, compressing that base copy down to 25-30% of it’s original size.  Then, it provides “virtual databases” from that base copy, each virtual database consuming almost no space at first, since almost everything is read from the base copy.  As changes are made to each virtual database, copy-on-write technology stores only those changes for only that virtual database.  So, each virtual database is presented as a full image of the source database, but costs practically nothing.  Even though the Oracle database instances reside on separate servers, the virtual database actually resides on the Delphix engine appliance and is presented via NFS.

I was asked to understand why the virtual databases were slow.

On the other end of the phone was Kyle, and he was easily able to show me with repeatable tests where and what the nature of the performance problems were, and that they were predictable and resolvable.

But I’m not really writing just about Delphix, even though it is very cool and quite earthshaking.  Rather, I’m writing about something bigger that has stormed into our industry, bringing to fruition something that I had tried — and failed — to accomplish at the turn of the century.  Back then, at the turn of the century, when some colleagues and I tried to build a hosted-application services company, we failed in two ways:  1) we were ahead of our time and 2) we chose the wrong customers.

Being ahead of one’s time is not a failure, strictly speaking.  It shows a clarity of vision, but bad timing.

However, choosing the wrong customers is absolutely a failure.

Before I explain, please be aware that I’m going to change most of the names, to protect any innocent bystanders…

After leaving Oracle in July 1998, I founded my own little company-of-one, called Evergreen Database Technologies (a.k.a. EvDBT).  The dot-com boom was booming, and I wanted to operate as an independent consultant.  I had been living in Evergreen in the foothills west of Denver for years, so the choice of name for my company was by no means a brilliant leap of imagination; I just named it after my hometown.  Business was brisk, even a bit overheated as Y2K approached, and I was busy.  And very happy.

In early 2000, I had been working with another young company called Upstart, and we felt that the information technology (IT) industry was heading in one inescapable direction:  hosted services.  So I joined Upstart and we decided that providing hosted and managed Oracle E-Business Suites (EBS) was a good business.  EBS is the world’s 2nd most prevalent Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system and can be dizzyingly complex to deploy.  It is deployed in hundreds of different industries and is infinitely customizable, so in order to avoid being eaten alive by customization requests by our potential customers, we at Upstart would have to focus on a specific industry and pre-customize EBS according to the best practices for that industry.  We chose the telecommunications industry, because it was an even bigger industry in Colorado then, as it is now.  We wanted to focus on small telecommunications companies, being small ourselves.  At that time, small telecommunications companies were plentiful because of governmental deregulation in the industry.  These companies offered DSL internet and phone services, and in June 2000 our market research told us it was a US$9 billion industry segment and growing.

Unfortunately, all of the big primary telecommunications carriers bought the same market research and were just as quick to catch on, and they undercut the DSL providers, provided cheaper and better service, and put the myriad of small startups out of business practically overnight.  “Overnight” is not a big exaggeration.

By October 2000, we at Upstart were stunned to discover that our customer base had literally ceased answering their phones, which is chillingly ominous when you consider they were telecommunication companies.   Of course, the carnage directly impacted the companies who had hoped to make money from those companies, such as Upstart.  Only 4 months in business ourselves, our target market had vanished like smoke.  You might say we were…. a little disconcerted.

We at Upstart had a difference of opinion on how to proceed, with some of the principals arguing to continue sucking down venture-capital funding and stay the course, while others (including me) argued that we had to find some way, any way, to resume generating our own revenue on which to survive.  I advocated returning to Upstart’s previous business model of consulting services, but the principals who wanted to stay the course with the managed services model couldn’t be budged.  By December 2000, Upstart was bankrupt, and the managed-services principals ransacked the bank accounts and took home golden parachutes for themselves.  I jumped back into my own personal lifeboat, my little consulting services company-of-one, Evergreen Database Technologies.  And continued doing what I knew best.

This was a scenario that I’m told was repeated in many companies that flamed out during the “dot-bomb” era.  There are a million stories in the big city, and mine is one of them.

But let’s just suppose that Upstart had chosen a different customer base, one that didn’t disappear completely within months?  Would it still have survived?

There is a good chance that we would still have failed due to being ahead of our times and also ahead of the means to succeed.  Hosted and managed applications, which today are called “cloud services”, were made more difficult back then by the fact that software was (and is) designed with the intention of occupying entire servers.  The E-Business Suites documentation from Oracle assumed so, and support at Oracle assumed the same.  This meant that we, Upstart, had to provision several entire server machines for each customer, which is precisely what they were doing for themselves.  There was little reason we could do it cheaper.  As a result, we could not operate much more cheaply than our customers had, resulting in very thin cost savings or efficiencies in that area, leaving us with ridiculously small profit margins.

Successful new businesses are not founded on incremental improvement.  They must be founded on massive change.

What we needed at that time was server virtualization, which came along a few years later in the form of companies like VMware.  Not until server virtualization permitted us to run enterprise software on virtual machines, which could be stacked en masse on physical server machines, could we have hoped to operated in a manner efficient enough to save costs and make money.

Fast forward to today.

Today, server virtualization is everywhere.  Server virtualization is deeply embedded in every data center.  You can create virtual machines on your laptop, a stack of blade servers, or a mainframe, emulating almost any operating system that has ever existed, and creating them in such a way that finally makes full use of all the resources of real, physical servers.  No longer would system administrators rack, wire, and network physical servers for individual applications using customized specifications for each server.  Instead, virtual machines could be configured according to the customized specifications, and those virtual machines run by the dozens on physical machines.

The advent of virtual machines also brought about the operations paradise of abstracting computer servers completely into software, so that they could be built, configured, operated, and destroyed entirely like the software constructs they were.  No more racking and wiring, one server per application.  Now, banks of “blades” were racked and wired generically, and virtual machines balanced within and across blades, with busier virtual machines moving toward available CPU, memory, and networking resources and quieter virtual machines yielding CPU, memory, and networking to others.  Best of all, all of this virtualization converted hardware into software, and could be programmed and controlled like software.

Everything is virtualized, and all was good.

Except storage.

Think about it.  It is easy and cheap to provision another virtual machine, using fractions of CPU cores and RAM.  But each of those virtual machines needs a full image of operating system, application software, and database.  While server virtualization permitted data centers to use physical servers more efficiently, it caused a positive supernova explosion in storage.  So much so that analysts like Gartner have predicted a “data crisis” before the end of the decade.

This is where Delphix comes in.

By virtualizing data as well as servers, it is now truly fast, cheap, and easy to provision entire virtual environments.  Delphix works with Oracle, and it also works with SQL Server, PostgreSQL, MySQL, DB2, and Sybase.  Even more importantly, it also virtualizes file-systems, so that application software as well as databases can be virtualized.

So back in early 2014, Kyle contacted me and asked if I would be interested in joining Delphix.  My first reaction was the one I always had, which is “no thanks, I’ve already got a job“.  I mean, I’m a successful and flourishing independent consultant.  Why would I consider working within any company anymore.  Business was brisk, I never had downtime, and the economy was improving.  I had successfully been operating as an independent consultant for most of the past 15 years.  Why fix what wasn’t broken?

But here was the crux of the matter…

I wanted to try something new, to expand beyond what I had been doing for the past 25 years since I first joined Oracle.  If it was a large established company beckoning, I wouldn’t have considered it for a second.  But a promising startup company, with a great idea and a four-year track record of success already, and still pre-IPO as well?

I couldn’t resist the gamble.  What’s not to like?

It’s possible I’ve made an enormous mistake, but I don’t think so.

Not to turn excessively morbid, but all of us are just a heartbeat away from our common destination.  I believe that, when I’m at the last moments of my life, the thing I fear will not be death itself, or pain, or leaving life behind.

It is regret that I fear.

And regret can take many forms, but the most painful regret will undoubtedly be what might have been, the opportunities passed or missed.  Career is only one aspect of life, and I don’t want to give it too much significance.  I’ve accumulated regrets in how I’ve lived my life, and how I’ve treated people in my life, and in some cases they are small but there are some which will always haunt me.

But with regards to my professional career, as Robert Frost said, I’ve taken the road less traveled, and that has made all the difference.  No regrets here.

Oracle ACE program

What is the Oracle ACE program?

The Oracle ACE program is a community advocacy program for Oracle technology evangelists and enthusiasts, sponsored by and managed by Oracle Corporation.  As stated on the ACE overview page at “http://oracle.com/technetwork/community/oracle-ace”, it is both a network as well as a resource for everyone in the Oracle community.  It is not a certification program, and there is no course to study and no test to pass.  Rather, the ACE program is a recognition program by one’s colleagues and peers, and joining is a process of nomination, review, and acceptance.

Who are Oracle ACEs?

They are your colleagues in the worldwide Oracle technology community, of which you and the RMOUG community here in Colorado are a significant part.  There are now more than 500 people in 55 countries around the world who have been recognized by their peers and by Oracle Corporation.  They are not employees of Oracle, but rather partners and customers of Oracle.

The ACE program is now 10 years old and comprises three levels…

ACE Associate logoACE Associate – this is the entry-point for the program and an ideal form of recognition for technology community advocates who are building their reputations

ACElogoACE– established advocates for Oracle technology who are well-known in their community

ACEDlogoACE Directors – top-tier members of the worldwide community who engage with many users groups and advocates and with Oracle Corporation

The ACE program is always growing, and the current members of the program are always happy to help you make the step up and jump to the next level in your career.  ACEs are expected to contribute to all or some of the following:

  • contribute actively to technical forums like OTN community forum or the ORACLE-L email list
  • publishing articles in newsletters, magazines, blogs
  • publishing books
  • tweet, post on social media
  • organize community activities such as Oracle users groups
  • present sessions at Oracle conferences and Oracle user group meetings

Few people do all these things, so don’t think that everyone does, but also please be aware that there are some who do, driving their careers above and beyond.

Joining the ACE program is not a one-time task, but an on-going commitment to contribution and sharing to build your community, whether that community is local to where you live, national, or world-wide.

To find out more about the program, go to the web page at “http://oracle.com/technetwork/community/oracle-ace/become-an-ace” or just contact one of the Oracle ACEs near you and ask questions.

That’s why we’re here.

If you want something done, ask a busy person…

This is a re-post I originally made on the ODTUG website on 17-Jan 2013 at the beginning of my two-year term on the board of directors...

This past weekend, I attended my first face-to-face Board of Directors meeting with ODTUG. Monty Latiolais, current president of ODTUG, asked me to let him know if there was anything “less than stellar” about my experience, and I have say the answer is “no”.  It was a stellar experience, all weekend.  Here’s why…

For 20 years, I’ve been a member of the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group.  My boss at Oracle at the time, Valerie Borthwick, told everyone in our team that the best thing we could do for our career and for our business practice was to “become famous”.  Not famous (or infamous) as in “celebrity” or “rock star”, but famous as in “known within our industry”.  Today, she would be telling us to blog and tweet, but back then, she was telling us to write and post white papers and to do presentations.  Put our ideas out there.  Discuss what we knew.  Submit to peer reviews.

The biggest thing I learned then is that you cannot claim to know something until you’ve tried to explain it to others.  Lots of people know something well.  But unless they’ve tried to explain it to others, there will be gaps in knowledge, fuzzy areas in understanding, and lack of depth.  Explaining to others fills gaps, clarifies fuzzy areas, and deepens the superficial.  Weak points are rapidly exposed while presenting information in public.  So, as I found ways to explain what I thought I already knew, I had to fix these problems, and my career flourished.

So in 1995, I joined the board of directors at RMOUG, because I wanted to spend more time around smart people, and see how they make things happen. That’s where I learned my next big lesson, which is when you have an important task, give it to a busy person, because they get it done.

It seems a bit counter-intuitive, but as you stop and observe those around you, it becomes obvious…

  • Some people like to think about doing things, but never do it
  • Others plan to do things, but never do it
  • Others talk themselves out of doing things before they ever get started, so they never do it
  • And others simply refuse to do anything

The people who are always busy are always getting things done.

That is what I found with the board of ODTUG, busy people who have plenty to do already, doing one more thing.

My favorite kind of people.

One year at Delphix

It’s been over a year since I leapt into the void.

OK, more than a little melodramatic.  In many respects, I was leaping from the void by joining a promising and exciting startup company like Delphix.

Business was still brisk as an independent consultant at EvDBT, but for the past several years, I was experiencing what I called “just-in-time engagements”.  That is, new consulting engagements were just mysteriously showing up at the right time just before the current one was ending.  Frankly, it was getting a bit spooky, and I had been on pins and needles for a couple years watching it happen, wondering like a farmer if the day would come when the rain did not appear on time.  That day had shown up previously, during the recession of 2001 – 2002, when I experienced about 2-3 weeks of no work early in 2002, but that was the only dry spell I encountered in almost 16 years at EvDBT.  However, I wasn’t eager to see another one…

So a little over twelve months ago, on 01-May 2014, I left the world of Oracle technology consulting that I had first entered on January 15, 1990.  Well, I haven’t really left Oracle technology, but I’m no longer making a living at it.  Oracle is a big part of Delphix, but only a part.

What have been the highlights during my first year at Delphix?

  • learning data virtualization
  • learning how to tune virtual databases for Oracle and SQL Server
  • learning VMware and earning my VCA certification
  • carving a personal niche within a small company
  • became proficient at Windows Powershell    <- no kidding!  true!
  • continuing to present at Oracle conferences, often traveling and presenting with my brilliant wife, Kellyn Gorman

Yes, Kellyn and I got married during the past year!  It took us each a few tries at marriage, but we each hung in there, and got it right this time.  They say that remarriage is the triumph of optimism over experience, and I’m delighted to say that optimism trumps experience.  We did the deed in grand style, spending the week at Oracle Open World in San Francisco, coming home on Friday and getting married that Sunday in a tiny ceremony with immediate family only.  We finished up the RMOUG TD2015 call-for-papers on Wednesday and Kellyn publshed the agenda on Thursday, and then on Saturday we flew to Europe to do a joint-keynote and present at the Slovenian Oracle Users Group in Ljubljana and the Croatian Oracle Users Group in Rovinj.  After spending time with Joze and his lovely wife Lili, we blasted out of Croatia and scooted over to beautiful Venice for a quiet, blissful week-long honeymoon, meeting with Lothar and his lovely wife Birgit during the week as well.

Then, it was back to reality through the end of the year, getting swept up in the preparations for the RMOUG conference.

Delphix had a spectacular Q4 ending on 31-January 2015, where that financial quarter alone equaled the earnings from the entire previous fiscal year.  Lots of celebrations, victory laps, and high fives at the company all-hands meeting in early February, but what none of us in the Professional Services division saw was the looming tsunami of freshly-sold new deployments cresting just over our heads.  That wave crested and crashed down on us, and I found myself buried in work.  Just now, four months later in the new fiscal year, I’m finally able to look up and look around to find that winter and spring have passed and summer has arrived.My second year at Delphix has begun, and I’m curious as to what it will bring.

I’m continuing to heed the advice of Tim Minchin, who counsels against pursuing one’s Big Dream and instead suggests passionate dedication to short-term goals, in short that one be “micro-ambitious”.  That is say, that thing that is right in front of you right now?  Do it the very best you can, and put your back into it.  Whether it is a blog post, cutting the lawn, an email, or a new wax ring for the toilet in the basement.  Especially the new wax ring – don’t bugger that up!  And then do the next thing the same way.  And the next.  And the next.  Before you know it, you’ve climbed a mountain and have made a pretty good career besides.

Not unexpectedly at a small fast-growing company, hints have been made of a transition from the technical track to the managerial track.  This would finally reverse the track switch I made over 20 years ago while at Oracle, when I stepped off the managerial track in favor of the technical track.  I’ve never looked back on that decision, but should I be “micro-ambitious” here as well, take the new task right in front of me, and work to excel?  Or stick to my guns, stay with the technical track?

I’ve learned that it is a mistake to just “go with the flow” and bob along with the prevailing current.  If one is to succeed at something new, it must be a whole-hearted plunge accompanied by a full-throated war cry.

So, if you hear a strange noise rather like a cross between a “Tarzan yell” and someone choking on an avocado pit, don’t be alarmed.  Just listen a little longer to find whether you hear the “splat” of my corpse hitting pavement, or the “whoosh” as I learn to fly again.

And rest assured, that wax ring in the downstairs toilet?  Nailed it.

Will the real data virtualization please stand up?

There is a post from a good friend at Oracle entitled “Will the REAL SnapClone functionality please stand up?” and, as well-written and technically rich as the post is, I am particularly moved to comment on the very last and conclusive sentence in the post…

So with all of that, why would you look at a point solution that only covers one part of managing your Oracle infrastructure?

The post does not refer to Delphix by name, and it could in fact be referring to any number of companies, but Delphix is the market leader in this space, so it is reasonable to assume that the “Product X” mentioned throughout the post is Delphix.  The same holds true for any post commenting on relational database technology, which can reasonably be assumed to refer to Oracle.  Regardless, I was struck by the use of the phrase point solution in that final sentence of the post, and how it really is a matter of perspective, and how interesting is that perspective.

First of all, before we go any further, please let me say that, as an Oracle DBA for the past 20 years, I think that the current release of Oracle’s Enterprise Manager, EM12c, is the finest and most complete release of the product since I tested early versions of Oracle EM alongside the Oracle8i database in the late 1990s.  At that time, the product was full of promise, but it wasn’t something upon which an enterprise could truly rely.  That has certainly changed, and it has been a long time coming, starting with the advent of utilities like AWR, ASH, and Active Session History.  If you have extensive Oracle technology in your organization, you should be using EM12c to manage it.  Not EM11g, or EM10g, but EM12c.  It really is that good, and it is getting better, and there are talented people behind it, and you simply need it if you want to maximize your investment in Oracle technology.

But just because EM12c is the center of the universe of Oracle technology, what about organizations for whom Oracle technology is merely a component?  Many organizations have diverse IT infrastructures comprising Microsoft, IBM, SAP, and open-source technologies, and all of those technology components share the need for the basic use-cases of quickly and economically cloning production to create non-production environments to support development, testing, reporting, archival, and training activities.

Should those diverse IT organizations employ a silo tool like EM12c just for cloning Oracle databases, and then find the same functionality separately for each of those other separate technologies?  Would doing so be a tactical or a strategic decision?

So in response to the final question in the SnapClone post, I ask another question in turn…

Why would one look at a point solution that covers only Oracle database?

Access to data for development and testing is the biggest constraint limiting development and testing, so it doesn’t make sense to not enable data virtualization for all applications, regardless of whether they are comprised of Oracle technology or not.  IT agility is a strategic capability important to the entire business, not a technical challenge for a component silo.

But perhaps, in the interest of continuing the Oracle-only focus of the SnapClone post, we could stay inside the bounds of Oracle.  Fair enough, as a theoretical exercise…

So, even if we limit the discussion only to Oracle technology, it quickly becomes obvious that another important question looms…

Why would one look at a point solution that covers only the Oracle database, leaving the application software, database software, configuration files, and all the other necessary parts of an application as a further problem to be solved?

Anybody who has managed IT environments knows that the database is just one part of a complete application stack.  This is true for applications by Oracle (i.e. E-Business Suites, PeopleSoft, JDEdwards, Demantra, Retek, etc), as well as prominent applications like SAP, and every other application vendor on the planet, and beyond.

To do this, one needs a solution that virtualizes file-system directories with software, files, and everything that comprises the application, not just an Oracle database.

To provision those complete environments for developers and testers quickly and inexpensively, one needs both server virtualization and data virtualization.

Unless one has spent the past 10 years in deep space chasing a comet, you’ve already got server virtualization on board.  Check.

Now, for data virtualization, you need to virtualize Oracle databases, check.  And you also need to virtualize SQL Server databases, check.  And PostgreSQL and Sybase databases, check and check.  In the near future, Delphix will likely be virtualizing IBM DB2 and MySQL databases, not to mention MongoDB and Hadoop, ‘cuz that’s what we do.  Check, check, … check-a-mundo dudes and dudettes.

Despite this, even if you’re a single-vendor organization, you need to virtualize files directories and files, on UNIX/Linux platforms as well as Windows servers.

Delphix does all of the above, which is one reason why it is the market leader in this space.

And it has been in general use for years, and so a substantial portion of the Fortune 500 already relies on data virtualization from Delphix today, across their entire technology portfolio, as the partial list online here shows.

Perhaps it is only a point solution from one perspective, but be sure that your perspective is aligned with that of your whole IT organization, and that you’re not just thinking of a strategic business capability as merely “functionality” within a silo.

Data Virtualization and Greener Data Centers

On the Saturday before the Oracle OpenWorld 2014 conference started, I had the added bonus of finding out that the Data Center Journal had published my article on how data virtualization leads to greener data centers.

So, rather than reprise the article here (which I’m tempted to do), please instead click here and give it a read!

Lovin’ la vida Oracle

As we prepare for the week of Oracle OpenWorld 2014, I look back on the 25 years I have spent within the orbit of Oracle Corporation.

I joined Oracle Consulting Services (OCS) as an employee on 15-January 1990 and worked my way to Technical Manager when I resigned to start my own consultancy on 31-July 1998.  I worked as an independent Oracle consultant from then (with a side trip into company-building with friends) until 30-April this year.  On 01-May 2014, I joined startup Delphix.

Throughout this quarter-century of La Vida Oracle, I’ve made a great living, but it has also been a great way of life.  I started presenting at the Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group in 1993, and joined the board of directors in 1995.  I’ve since worked with many other Oracle users groups as a volunteer and I’ve found the experiences to be incredibly educational, in so many ways.  I’ve also met a lot of amazing people through volunteering at Oracle users groups.  I met the junta of the Oak Table Network, and joined that group in 2002.  I was elected as an Oracle ACE in 2007, before I even knew the program existed, then I was made an ACE Director in 2012, which is an elevation I appreciate but still never sought.

But over it all, all throughout, is Oracle.  The Big Red O.  Some people have had bad experiences at Oracle Corporation, some have had REALLY bad experiences, just as people have good and bad experiences at any huge corporation.  In the spirit of a comment made famous by Winston Churchill, “Democracy is the absolute worst form of government.  Except for all the others.”  Oracle is populated by, and led by, some very human … beings.  I love them all, some more than others.

So for 25 years now, out of the 37 years Oracle has been in existence, I have had a really great life.  La vida Oracle.  I am so GLAD I met ya!  And I love this life!

And so it continues today.  For the first time in a quarter century, I’m out of the direct orbit of Oracle, now that I’m working at Delphix.  I’m still heavily involved with Oracle as an Oracle ACE Director and adviser to the boards of three local Oracle users groups (RMOUG, NoCOUG, and NEOOUG) and a board member at ODTUG.

Delphix builds data virtualization software for Oracle, PostgreSQL, SQL Server, and Sybase ASE, as well as file-system directories on Unix/Linux and Windows.  Virtualizing Oracle databases is a big part of Delphix’s business, but it is not the only part, and the non-Oracle parts are growing rapidly.  It’s refreshing to work with other database technologies.  But I still love working with Oracle Database, and I’m continually impressed by Oracle’s technology prowess, with the In-Memory option of Database12c a brilliant example.

Some say that Delphix competes with Oracle.  Be serious – please name a technology company that doesn’t compete with Oracle in one way or another, as the breadth of Oracle products and services is so expansive.

As an independent contractor at EvDBT for 16 years, I myself competed with Oracle Consulting in my own very small way.  But, at the same time I cooperated with Oracle by optimizing the implementation of Oracle technology.  I sure as heck understand who hold the tent up.

The same is true with Delphix.  As a company, Delphix products can be said to compete with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control, in the niche area known as Database-As-A-Service (DBaaS) in the specific SnapClone functionality.  The Delphix software appliance is very similar to this SnapClone piece, but this part of the Oracle product is just a small part of the scope the vast EM12c Cloud Control product suite.

In the same way, I as an independent consultant could have been said to have competed with the EM12c diagnostics pack and performance tuning pack, because the techniques I used and taught tended to make people independent of those tools.

That’s not to say I steered people away from EM12c; it’s just that I myself didn’t use it for performance tuning, though gradually I learned to appreciate many of its features, not least through paying attention to my wife Kellyn Pot’vin.

In fact, the Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control, using the Cloud API, can fully administer virtual databases created by Delphix.  After all, Delphix is just an alternate mechanism to implement data virtualization.  Instead of using the mechanism of Oracle DBaaS SnapClone, customers can also use Delphix.  So Delphix can become a part of EM12c.

So there is no competition between Delphix and Oracle.  Delphix is an alternative to the SnapClone mechanism underlying DBaaS, but Delphix virtual databases can still be orchestrated through the EM12c console.  It need not be an either-or choice.

Of course, I still have to write that extension through the EM12c cloud API, and I’m getting right on that.  Unless someone else gets to it first.

Keep your eye on the Oracle EM12c Extension Exchange webpage for more progress on integrating Delphix within EM12c…

#OakTable World at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

WhereChildren’s Creativity Museum, 221 4th St, San Francisco

When:  Mon-Tue, 29-30 September, 08:30 – 17:00 PDT

For the third year in a row at the same fantastic location right in the heart of the bustling Oracle OpenWorld 2014 extravaganza, OakTable World 2014 is bringing together the top geeks of the worldwide Oracle community to present on the topics not approved for the OpenWorld conference.  At the OpenWorld conference.  For free.

The beauty of this unconference is its ad-hoc nature.  In 2010, weary of flying from Europe to endure marketing-rich content, Mogens Norgaard conceived Oracle ClosedWorld as an informal venue for those who wanted to talk about cool deep-technical topics.  Oracle ClosedWorld was first held in the back dining room at Chevy’s Fresh Mex on 3rd and Howard, fueled by Mogens’ credit card holding an open tab.  The following year in 2011, ClosedWorld was moved a little ways down Howard Street to the upstairs room at the Thirsty Bear, once again fueled by Mogens’ (and other) credit cards keeping a tab open at the bar.

In 2012, Kyle Hailey took the lead, found a fantastic venue, herded all the cats to make a 2-day agenda, and arranged for corporate sponsorship from Delphix, Pythian, and Enkitec, who have continued to sponsor OakTable World each year since.

If you’re coming to Oracle OpenWorld 2014 and are hungry for good deep technical content, stop by at OakTable World 2014, located right between Moscone South and Moscone West, and get your mojo recharged.

If you’re local to the Bay Area but can’t afford Oracle OpenWorld, and you like deep technical stuff about Oracle database, stop by and enjoy the electricity of the largest Oracle conference in the world, and the best Oracle unconference right in the heart of it all.

OakTable World 2014 – driven by the OakTable Network, an informal society of drinkers with an Oracle problem.

#CloneAttack at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

Delphix and Dbvisit will be at the OTN Lounge in the lobby of Moscone South from 3:30 – 5:00pm on Monday 29-Sept.  Come join us to hear about #CloneAttack and #RepAttack, two great hands-on learning opportunities.

What:

#CloneAttack is your chance to install a complete Delphix lab environment on your Windows or Mac laptop for you to play with and experiment at any time.  Experts Kyle Hailey, Steve Karam, Adam Bowen, Ben Prusinski, and I will be sharing USB “thumb” drives with the virtual machine OVA files for the lab environment, and we will be working one-on-one with you to help you get everything up and running, then to show you basic use-cases for cloning with Delphix.

Bring your laptop, bring your VMware, and get some data virtualization into your virtual life!

At the same time, #CloneAttack will be joined by #RepAttack by Dbvisit, where Arjen Visser, Jan Karremans, and the team will be helping you replicate Oracle to Oracle for zero downtime upgrades.

This just in!  #MonitorAttack from Confio SolarWinds will also be joining the party at the CCM on Tuesday to show you how to quickly and easily install Confio Ignite and enjoy the great features there.

Where:

Children’s Creativity Museum, 221 4th St, San Francisco

When:

Tuesday, Sept 30 from 10am – 5pm PDT

Before you arrive:

Hardware requirements (either Mac or Windows):

  • at least 8 GB RAM
  • at least 50 GB free disk space, but preferably 100 GB free
  • at least 2 Ghz CPU, preferably dual-core or better